How to increase your odds of surviving COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses Part III

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How to increase your odds of surviving COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses  Part III

Vitamin A helps protect the epithelium and mucus membranes.  Epithelial cells line our lungs as well. Vitamin A also promotes a healthy and more balanced immune system.  Low serum carotenoids are associated with greater mortality.

Eat sweet potatoes, carrots, broccoli, squash, organic spinach, cantaloupe, grass-fed beef liver, and egg yolks.  Drink organic carrot juice. Do not buy synthetic beta carotene. Beta-carotene intake is best from food, not supplements.

Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin, so some fat is needed to absorb it.  Anyone with poor digestion (history of gastric surgery, taking acid blockers, celiac, alcoholic, and elderly, etc.) or poor diet may be at risk for vitamin A deficiency.  High doses of vitamin D can also decrease Vit A absorption and cause a Vit A deficiency. It may be best to take Vit D and A supplements separately at different times of the day.  Micellized vitamin A may be better absorbed.

High doses of vitamin A can be harmful and toxic to the liver.  If supplements are purchased, consider doses of not more than 5000 to 10000 IU, which can be taken 2 to 5 days out of the week, depending on diet.

Magnesium has anti-inflammatory properties.  Most people are deficient in magnesium.  Magnesium sulfate can decrease PARP-1 expression, which in turn may inhibit NF-κB induced inflammatory responses.

Magnesium sulfate is also known as Epsom Salts, and 2 cups of Epsom salts in bath water can make a good soak.  If your bathwater is chlorinated, just neutralize the chlorine with a capsule of 500 mg Vit C, or 1/4-1/2 tsp of ascorbic acid powder.

Terry Pfau DO, HMD