Suboxone Pause Helped With Low Dose Naltrexone

Suboxone is designed to ease withdrawal symptoms for people working to overcome opioid addictions. When use is supervised by a medical professional and therapy is also given, Suboxone is effective at reducing cravings and lessening the severity of opiate withdrawal symptoms.  However, the long term effects of coming off Suboxone can be just as bad as those experienced off opiates.

Jeff went on suboxone 4 years ago after becoming addicted to hydrocodone.  Not liking how it made him feel he went to a treatment center that specialized in helping those wanting to wean off this medication.   He was able to get off of suboxone but experienced what is known as post-acute withdrawal symptoms. 

For the last 7 months, he suffered from severe fatigue, depression and brain fog.  In his words “ the toughest part is the depression. There are days that all I can do is watch TV.  I have zero happiness and zero feelings. When the brain fog hits me it is like someone puts a lead suit over me and I am walking underwater.  The only thing that gives me relief is a hot bath with Epson salts.”

We started Jeff on low dose naltrexone (LDN) and almost immediately he began feeling better.

“I’m amazed”, he related, “ at how the brain fog has dissipated.  I feel in control again. Before I never knew when the brain fog would hit.  I was stunned that the depression left. With the hope that I have, I’m taking action and starting a new company.  My friend even commented that I seem to be on my game again. Overall I am 80% better.”

Jeff’s energy also improved but not as drastically as his emotional health.  For six months it averaged a 2 on a scale of 10 and is now up to 6.  

Many people who try to come off suboxone end up going back on it after 9 months because the symptoms from the suboxone pause are unbearable.  

Terry Pfau DO, HMD

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